Robert Rosenstone

Rosenstone book Cover.jpg

As a new academic year begins so too do the Futures of History seminars. This year Robert Rosenstone will be giving the first seminar.

Robert Rosenstone Adventures of a Postmodern Historian: Living and Writing the Past

Robert will discuss his evolving historiographical development over the last fifty plus years in relation to the wider cultural environment, changing notions of the “historical,” and his own life experiences undertaking research in Franco Spain, the Soviet Union, Japan, and Hollywood. He will illustrate some of these experiences and larger cultural shifts with brief readings from his new book.  The larger point is not just to show how the historian is inevitably a creature of the times, but to more specifically suggest how notions of what we consider to be “history” can and have changed significantly in the last half century, and how those macro changes can strongly impact the micro level of the individual historian.

Everyone is welcome and there will be home-made cake. Hope to see you there.

Friday 30th September 1-3pm, St Mary’s University, Twickenham, Senior Common Room

Robert A. Rosenstone, Professor of History Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology is one of the most prominent names in the fast-growing subfield of history in the visual media.  He has written works of history, biography, criticism, and fiction. His historical writings include Crusade of the Left: The Lincoln Battalion in the Spanish Civil War (1969), Romantic Revolutionary: A Biography of John Reed (1975), and Mirror in the Shrine (1988), while his books on the media include Visions of the Past (1995) and History on Film / Film on History (2006), and two edited collections, Revisioning History (1995) and A Blackwell Companion to Historical Film (2013). His fiction includes a book of stories, The Man Who Swam into History (2002), and two novels, King of Odessa (2003) and Red Star, Crescent Moon (2010). Rosenstone has worked as a consultant on several documentaries and feature films, including the Academy Award-winning Reds (1982).  He has served on the editorial boards of the American Historical Review and Reviews in American History, and is a founding editor of Rethinking History: The Journal of Theory and Practice.  

If you have any questions please email Claire or Mark.

claire.norton@stmarys.ac.uk

mark.donnelly@stmarys.ac.uk

 

 

 

Pasts Without History – Programme

We have a great two-day symposium planned for next Tuesday adn Wednesday. programme is below. Everyone is welcome – see here for more details about the papers. Email Claire or Mark for more information 

Pasts Without History: Politics and the Practical Past

21-22 June 2016

 Tuesday 21 June 2016

 Room: Senior Common Room

10.00-10.15     Refreshments and Introduction

10.15-11.00     Bernard Regan, Kiri Tunks – Beyond the Wall

11.00-11.45     Martin Davies – History: the technocratic management of an artificial world

 11.45-12.00     Break

12.00-12.45     Vicky Iglikowski – Putting Files on Film

12.45-1.00       Round-up Discussion

1.00-1.45         Lunch

Room: G5

1.45-2.30         Jelena Juresa – Moving Image and Memory: tackling identity questions through music

2.30-3.15         Paul Antick – Three Places I Never Went To When I Was Alive

3.15-3.30         Break                        

3.30-4.15         Amy Roberts – Interference Archive

4.15-4.45         Round-up Discussion

6.15                 Meet at Reception for meal at a local restaurant

 

 

Wednesday 22 June 2016

 Room: Senior Common Room

9.30-10.15       Gisele Iecker de Almeida – Where to now? The future in the present (with a stopover in the past)

10.15-11.00     Jean Debney – The ‘Presented(ed)’-ness of the Before Now

11.00-11.15     Break

11.15-12.00     Joe Iosbaker – Putting Israel on Trial in a U.S. Court: the case of Rasmea Odeh

12.00-12.45     Pete Kyle – After the War

12.45-1.30       Lunch

1.30-2.15         Helen Bendon – Spatialising History

2.15-3.00         Jim Kosem – Reading, Writing, Design, Life and History

3.00-3.15         Break

3.15-4.00         Phoenix – Archives of Resistance

4.00-4.30         Round-up Discussion

End of Conference

 

 

Pasts Without History: Politics and the Practical Past

pier

The Centre for the Philosophy of History will host a two-day symposium in June.

Pasts without History: politics and the practical past

21-22nd June 2016

The symposium will explore how past narratives are used outside of a strictly academic context: in museums, community archives, on Facebook, by artists, novelists and activists. The aim is to decenter elite or sedimented forms of historicisation, to consider alternative narrations of our pasts and how these can and are used to interrogate our presents and imagine better futures. What is at stake is not just a matter of sharing authority over the past, but in some circumstances wresting it back from dominant interests who exclude voices, perspectives and narratives from the field of historical knowledge. Our aim is to show that non-institutional, vernacular ways of producing ‘truths’ about the past can be a good starting point for discussions of what to do in the present – and one that is based on more inclusive understandings of whose voices count in the debate. Participants include artists, activists, curators, novelists and archivists.

For more information, details on speakers please see here.

Everyone is welcome

Seminar Paper by Alun Munslow on Wednesday 11th November

800px-E8_graph.svgThe next Futures of History seminar will happen on Wednesday 11th November 2015 at 1.30 in the Senior Common Room, St Mary’s University. Alun Munslow will be giving a paper entitled “Historical Explanation and Experimental History in 3,003 Words” in which he will revisit/re-vitalise the notion of experimentalism and argue that experimental historying confronts and up fronts the ontological distinction between the past and history.

Everyone is welcome and there will as usual be a selection of homemade cakes and cookies. For more details email claire.norton@stmarys.ac.uk or mark.donnelly@stmarys.ac.uk

Image is “E8 graph” by Claudio Rocchini – Own work. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:E8_graph.svg#/media/File:E8_graph.svg

Futures of History Seminar Series

writer

Liz Oakley-Brown (Lancaster University) will give a paper entitled “Reanimating the Author?: Early Modern Literary Biographies and Biographical Criticism Now” as part of the St Mary’s University Centre for the Philosophy of History’s Future of History seminar series. The talk will take place on Thursday 23rd April at 2pm in the Senior Common Room at St Mary’s University, Twickenham.

Toward the end of the introduction to their edited collection of essays Writing Lives: Biography and Textuality, Identity and Representation in Early Modern England (Oxford 2008), Kevin Sharpe and Steven N. Zwicker ask ‘How…might we conceive and write early modern lives in a time after postmodernity?’ (p.25). With this question in mind, Liz’s paper reviews some conceptual frameworks of recent early-modern literary biographies and looks toward a possible model for future research. 

Tea/coffee and home-made cake will be available. Everyone is welcome.

Berlin’s Invisible Omelettes: Human Nature and the Before Now

depositphotos_54006485-Walking-Carefully-Through-Broken-Egg-ShellsNext Thursday (12th March) at 2pm the Centre for the Philosophy of History at St Mary’s University will host a paper by Stephen Rainey in our Future of History Seminar Series. 

The title of Stephen Rainey’s paper is “Berlin’s Invisible Omelettes: Human Nature and the Before Now”

Abstract: Isaiah Berlin champions a sort of humanism inspired by Tolstoy to replace a C17th view of human nature. This comes through in his analysis of Giambattista Vico and Johann Gottfried von Herder. This analysis presents us with a way of looking at history in an unsettled, value-laden and contestable way. Whilst Berlin might be right about this view of history, it isn’t clear that his argument supports his conclusion. Specifically, it looks like Berlin remakes the mistakes of C17th thinkers like Descartes and posits a sort of human nature to underwrite his interpretive, postmodern history.

Dr. Stephen Rainey is a Research Fellow in Philosophy at St Mary’s University, Twickenham, having previously worked in European research projects in Belgium. He obtained his PhD in 2008 from Queen’s University, Belfast. Dr. Rainey has published articles on topics related to the philosophy of language, artificial intelligence, ethics, governance and rationality. He continues research in these areas and others. He also acts as an ethics expert for the ethics sector of the European Commission.

Everyone is welcome to the seminar. It will be held in the Senior Common Room at St Mary’s University, Twickenham and will start at 2pm. There will be a discussion and home made cake afterwards.

To see a list of our future seminars please click here

For details of past papers click here

For further details please contact Claire.norton@smuc.ac.uk or Mark.Donnelly@smuc.ac.uk

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History, Ethics and Justice

history and Justice

The next Futures of History: Cake and theory seminar will take place on Tuesday 7th October at St Mary’s University. The seminar will start at 2.30pm in the Senior Common Room – for more details about the series see here

The seminar will consist of two papers by Berber Bevernage and Anton Froeyman both from the University of Ghent followed by a discussion

Berber Bevernage

History courted by law: Some reflections on the judicialization of
history, historicization of jurisdiction

Anton Froeyman

Ethics for historians: an overview

There will of course be cake and everyone is welcome.

The image is of Justice and History a sculpture by Thomas Crawford located above the Senate bronze doors on the Capitol’s East Front – see here for more details.