Student Conference – Philosophy of History: Truths, Power, Ethics

Today is our Fifth Annual Undergraduate  Philosophy of History Conference and we have come interesting papers – I am looking forward to it. Below is the programme:

Philosophy of History: Truths, Power, Ethics

Fifth Annual Undergraduate Conference

Friday 5 December 2014

Senior Common Room

 

10.00  Refreshments

10.10  Welcome: Mark Donnelly & Claire Norton

 

10.15  Panel One: Whose truths?

  • Joe Hooper, Paul Antick’sBhopal to Bridgehampton. Does the use of fictive devices make an account any less valid?
  • Joanne Rolling, Zlata’s Diary: An Exposition of Truth from the Siege of Sarajevo.
  • Alexandra Melham, Fact and fiction: can we learn from historical novels?
  • Jack Cooke, State controlled history: Memory and the manipulation of the masses.

 

11.00 Refreshment Break

 

11.15  Panel Two: Museums, remains and representations

  • Lorna McGrath, Museums: how are they presenting history?
  • Ciaran Clint, ‘The Burden of History:’ Activism, Museums and Disobedient Objects.
  • Georgina Woolfe, When will the dead be able to Rest in Peace? Human Remains and their place in museums.
  • Caitlin Jennings, To what extent do Interpretive Communities influence how history is written?
  • Nadia Townsend, What makes Truman Capote’s bookIn Cold Blood an historical account?

 

12.15 Break for lunch

 

12.45  Panel Three: Memory, memorials, Mau Mau

  • Ashleigh Weaver, Death and Memory as Tools of Activism: The Anarchist Subculture in America, 1890-1939.
  • Emily Lundie Authority in a historicised world: exploiting the past and the politics of collective memory and the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial​.
  • Fatima Ullah,The rightful remembrance for the Mau Mau?
  • Maria Alempic, Mau Mau and the function of history
  • Amy Mawson, Why memorials can be problematic.

 

1.45    Panel Four: Fact, fiction and naming

  • Sebastian Reynolds, Blurring the Boundaries of History: Art Spiegelman’s ‘Maus’.
  • Rhianna Doran, ‘Maus: a challenge to Power, historical methodology and the fact/fiction divide.’
  • Harry Batory, Does historical fiction and literature produce similar or dissimilar narratives?
  • Cate Blackmore, No Longer a Terrorist Movement: A discussion on interpretive naming and the change in theoretical discourse in relation to Apartheid South Africa.

 

2.30    Refreshment Break

 

2.45 Panel Five: Pedagogy and authority over the past

  • Cas Hance, History, authority and teaching the national curriculum
  • Aimee Garraghan, The Second World War and Key stage 3 History curriculum
  • James Dodd, The use of a textbook as a symbol of authority
  • Maria Bourke Are historical films representative of historical truth?
  • Anthony O’Reilly, Should we eradicate the authority of history?

 

3.45 Panel Six: Making histories

  • Siobhan Trainor, Are historical accounts written using innovative or experimental forms a less reliable source?
  • Plum Bou-Assouf, Title unconfirmed
  • Lydia Birch, Title unconfirmed
  • Anthony Wareham, Title unconfirmed

 

4.30    Closing remarks

Conference ends

3 thoughts on “Student Conference – Philosophy of History: Truths, Power, Ethics

  1. […] I made these cookies for my students. As part of their assessment for the philosophy of history module we organise a conference and they all give short papers on a research project they have been doing. It is just like an academic conference with panels and questions, so of course it also needs food and especially cake. I made these chocolate biscuits taken from Dan Lepard, Short and Sweet (234) but without the mint cream sandwiching them together – too messy to carry around London for the day. I also made them some oat, ginger and raisin cookies and will post about them later. All 27 (!) papers look really exciting and I am looking forward to the day – I hope they are too. You can see the programme here. […]

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    • It was a fantastic day. The students spent 7 hours presenting and energetically discussing issues arising from the cultural politics of historicisation. Particularly highlights for me were their sophisticated uses of Davies, Cohen and Foucault in the context of their particular examples of the coercive potential that historical narratives and historicisation more generally have. We had quite an exchange as to whether we should even bother with history any more which I hope they will continue next Thursday.

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